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Muscle mass and strength peak between the ages of 20 and 35 years and steadily decline thereafter until the sixth decade of life where a sharp decline occurs. This loss in muscle mass and function adversely affects normal activities of daily living, like getting up from a chair, for many older people. Recent studies provide a strong case for creatine supplementation in offsetting these effects of aging. After just 7 days of creatine supplementation (20 g per day divided in 3 equal doses) or placebo, women between the ages of 58 and 71 years showed a remarkable improvement in several measures of muscular performance. Creatine supplementation led to significant increases in maximal bench press and leg press strength, upper and lower body power, and two functional performance tasks encountered during everyday life -- a sit and stand test and a tandem gait test. These improvements in functional performance occurred despite no physical training during the 7 day period and no side effects were reported, highlighting the simple yet effective use of creatine to enhance physical performance in older individuals.

Gotshalk LA, Kraemer WJ, Mendonca MA, Vingren JL, Kenny AM, Spiering BA, Hatfield DL, Fragala MS, Volek JS. Creatine supplementation improves muscular performance in older women. Eur J Appl Physiol. 2007 Oct 18; [Epub ahead of print]