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While protein supplementation after a workout clearly increases protein synthesis, some argue that the increased protein has a negative effect on bone. According to a recent study, protein supplementation during 6 months of resistance training did not have a negative effect on bone, in fact, bone health was actually improved compared to a group who supplemented with carbohydrate. The group who received additional protein also experienced a greater increase in one of the most powerful anabolic hormones, i nsulin-like growth factor-1. The protein intake in this group was 162 g/day compared to 85 g/day in the carbohydrate-supplemented group. Protein supplementation does not adversely affect bone, rather it enhances adaptations in bone in response to resistance training.

Vukovich MD, et al. Effect of protein supplementation during a 6 month strength and conditioning program on bone geometry. Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology, Washington D.C., April, 2004. Abstract #851.10.

Ballard TP, et al. The effect of protein supplementation on plasma insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I) levels during a 6-month strength and conditioning program. Federation of American Societies for Experimental Biology, Washington D.C., April, 2004. Abstract #851.11.