Support for caffeine!


By Dwayne Jackson
Sep 2, 2011

There has been a recent surge of studies published on the ergogenic effects of caffeine. This is timely since caffeine makes up the backbone of most preworkout formulas on the market today. A most recent article published in the Journal of Applied Physiology investigated the effect of caffeine supplementation (6 mg/kg body weight) on performance and sodium / potassium levels under two different intermittent exercise paradigms.
Extreme Caffeine
more info about vectron
In study one, the exercise was a high intensity intermittent shuttle run (called the Yo-Yo intermittent recovery test) and in study two the subjects performed one-legged knee extension exercise. In study 1, the researchers reported that those who received caffeine supplementation performed 16% better than the placebo group, had greater peak blood glucose and ammonia, and higher plasma free fatty acids throughout the exercise bout. During the knee extension exercise (study 2) the authors reported that caffeine decreased muscle interstitial potassium levels but had no effect on sodium levels compared to placebo. Overall they concluded that caffeine supplementation prior to intense exercise improves performance, which may be related to a reduction in exercising muscle potassium levels.


Reference:
Mohr M, Nielsen JJ, Bangsbo J. Caffeine intake improves intense intermittent exercise performance and reduces muscle interstitial potassium accumulation. J Appl Physiol. 2011 Aug 11. [Epub ahead of print]



Disclaimer: The articles featured herein are for informational purposes only and should not be construed as medical advice. Specific medical advice should only be obtained from a licensed health care professional. No liability is assumed by ProSource for any information herein.

Copyright ©  ProSource Performance Products, Inc.   All rights reserved.   Date printed: