The notion of "power" and "force development" is one that you hear a great deal in the " iron game." In-fact the notion of developing maximal force whether'"directing, accepting or re-directing'"sits at the cornerstone of my "Concepts of Training." And while I note this endlessly in my teaching, the question looms large: Just precisely "how" do you do this?

I have gone to great length in the past discussing the basics of lifting and how proper training protocols are quite "simple." Noting that resistance work is basically pushing, pulling, pressing or squatting, I choose from a very basic stable of six major lifts and then embellish them with less complicated movements that support their development.

The major compliance problem in the iron game isn't merely exercise choices but how they are performed. A cursory review of trade magazines and many of the most well-known "experts" reveal an astonishing and recurring flaw in that subjects typically do not "project" weight properly when it comes to classic movements such as Squats or Deadlifts. Ultimately this issue of movement generation becomes the signal greatest problem for the training professional or dedicated exercise enthusiast when they begin implementing a well designed training program.

With this in mind, I wanted to present a unique article series that will help you develop an injury free and flexible physique, while promoting powerful movement generation. To do so, we'll borrow upon a very large body of work found in my " RED2" and " DMC" training system in "With Grace". 

To start things off, we'll look at the preliminary floor-based movements found in the DMC